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I’m off to Bordeaux (the city and the country) tomorrow.
Have you visited? If so, what are your recommendations? 
Merci!

I’m off to Bordeaux (the city and the country) tomorrow.

Have you visited? If so, what are your recommendations?

Merci!

Tags: Bordeaux
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When I hear someone call Autumn ‘Fall’

Me: Is this how you feel when I say Fall?

Coworker: 100%

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Day Trip to Hatfield

An hour north of London is Hatfield House and Royal Palace, which is famous because:

  1. The Palace was the childhood home and favourite residence of Henry VIII’s children, King Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth I.
  2. The House is a prime example of Jacobean architecture, built in 1611 by Robert CecilFirst Earl of Salisbury and Chief Minister to King James I. It currently is the home of the 7th Marquess of Salisbury

A bunch of French gourmands planned to crossed the Channel two Sundays ago to bring bread, pastries, cheese, charcuterie, and more to the historic English house. Being an English history and pain au chocolat fanatic, I jumped at the opportunity. 

One hour drive later, through the most beautiful north London landscape and passed a slew of impressive houses, we arrived. 

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This face says it all…..the baked on-premise pastries were out of this world.

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With our bellies full of dough and cafe, we popped into Hatfield House for  a proper tour. To say the Jacobean house was ornate would be an understatement.  Dark wood was definitely a key feature of 17th century decor. 

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Some of the most famous paintings of Hatfield’s HBIC, Elizabeth I, were hung throughout. If you’re a fan of Philippa Gregory Tudor books, it’s amazing to see these up close and personal. 

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While peaking out to the gardens, I noticed something rarely seen at historical houses….

Evidence that the current aristocracy still lives there….in their private wing.

Apparently the current Marquess of Salisbury and family drive Volvos and ride around on scooters.  So normal.  

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Off we went to explore the grounds…

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Hatfield is currently hosting “The Great British Sculpture Show”, a roundup of mystical creatures peppered throughout the gardens.  Most had us scratching our heads, but these are some of my favorites…

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And this was my absolute favorite. In fact, I want to create a replica for my future dream garden.

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As afternoon set in, we curled up for a picnic among the imposing oak trees and my inner Tudor devotee thought of the pivotal moment I’ve read about in countless books….

The moment when Elizabeth learned of her succession to the throne….while sitting under one of the oak trees.

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Parental Visit Part 1

After an adventure across Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, and the Czech Republic, my Mom and Michael ended their trip with a long weekend in London.

With less than 72 hours to explore, we squeezed in a jam-packed, borderline exhausting itinerary, but we had a phenomenal time.  

So much so that I, shockingly, forgot to take photos.  Here are the couple I did take….along with highlights. 

Dinner at Nopi, sister restaurant of the London renowned, Ottolenghi. 

Finally saw Book of Mormon. My expectations were high and they were hilariously exceeded.

In my opinion, no London visit is complete without a taste test through Borough Market. Turns out, it was the market’s 1,000 year anniversary.

Yes, that is correct - there has been a market on this square for ONE THOUSAND YEARS!

A BrakeAway Grand London Bike Tour.  Within three hours, we saw almost all the major landmarks, learned little-known facts, and toured sleepy side streets where historically famous Londoners used to live.  I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again - bike tours are the best way to get a feel of a big city and when they’re as personalised as BrakeAway, even better. 

My Dad and Step-Mom arrive in a couple of days for the Parental Visit Part II, so the whirlwind UK tour will continue.

Tags: London
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Random People Try Jewish Food For The First Time.

Love your gefilte fish, chopped liver and kugel? Me too. So very much.

You’ll probably also love the hilarious reactions of these people trying jewish food for the first time.

Best line? “This is the gateway drug to Jewish food.”

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Primrose Hill Picnic

Joel and I are being nomadic, per usual.

We moved from Marylebone to Belsize Park for the month while we wait to move (again) into our new flat….in a new neighbourhood. 

So, what’s been my favourite part of living in North London for the past couple weeks?

Casual strolls and picnics in Hampstead Heath and Primrose Hill.

Example A.

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48 Hours in the Cotswolds - Daylesford Farm

Imagine spending a weekend in a Nancy Meyer’s film, like It’s Completed or Something’s Gotta Give.

Imagine the sumptuous, perfectly styled decor…

The rustic scenery…

The bakery where everything is made from ingredients plucked directly from the surrounding farm.

This serenity, in a nutshell, is Daylesford Farm in the Cotswolds.

One year ago I moved to London knowing almost no one.  It was daunting and overwhelming, but here I am a year later settled, happy and celebrating the Hen Do of a new friend!

Kristina had a relaxing weekend in mind for her Hen Weekend, so off we went to Paddington Station where we literally sprinted for our train track. All aboard, out of breath and sweaty, we refreshed ourselves with wine and treats brought over by Claire from France. It was as tasty as you imagine.

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1 1/2 hours later, we arrived to the farm and scoped out our cottage. It felt more like walking onto a decor magazine magazine photo shoot than real life. 

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In addition to several cottages, the Daylesford property also includes a cafe, restaurant, bakery, shop and spa. 

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It was August, but the weather was even cooler than usual, so e tucked in for a quiet night of pizzas, made on property in the wood oven, a roasting fire and Bridget Jones Diary, which was ironically on TV that night.  So corny and perfect at the same time.

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Daylesford cottages are stocked with complimentary fresh goodies from the farm, like eggs, milk, bread, biscuits, butter and jam to whip up up a delicious breakfast.  

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There was a yoga class in an all white barn, which was more of relaxing stretching session than ‘feel the burn’.

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Followed by massages, pedicures in a potted shed and naps in their glass serenity lounge.

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The rest of the day was totally, utterly and completely lazy…in the best way possible. 

When tea time came around (when in England…), we popped into the shop and picked up the most delicious lemon drizzle cake.  

I don’t even like lemon, but it was so good that I went back the next day to grab one for my colleagues. 

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We made our way into ‘town’ that evening where we saw quintessentially English houses and dined at the Wild Rabbit. 

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 Not only is the Wild Rabbit owned by the same woman as Daylesford (so you know it’s going to be incredible), but it also attracts the "Chipping Norton set" (a term I only just learned) and described as the "poshest pub in Britain".  

After our dining experience, I completely agree. Compared to a typical gastropub, the Wild Rabbit was definitely cozier…and fancier.

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The next day brought our first bit of sunshine, the perfect time to tour the farm and grounds.

Cows, sheep, meadows, berry bushes, rolling hills, babbling brooks….Daylesford has all this and more right on your doorstep.

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Over lunch back at the cottage, we began plotting a return trip.  It’s such an easy journey from London and everything from the scenery and the food to the staff and the cottages are a A+. 

To say I loved Daylesford would be an understatement and I cannot wait to go back and experience even more of what the farm has to offer….particularly the cooking class!

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One Year and Three Days Ago….

I moved to London. 

While back home visiting family and friends in July, I spent a lot of time reflecting on the passed year.

What do I like most about life in the UK?

Do I feel like I’ve fit in?

Am I accustomed to British culture?

The answer is….

I’m still not used to unexpected mini rain storms,

Or the constant use of the word “sorry”. 

When people ask, I now refer to Lady as a cross, not a mutt, 

And I say a meal “tastes nice” instead of “tastes good”. 

I mostly drink tea, but if I do have a coffee, I’ll order it as a “skinny latte” instead of “skim”. 

Looking right when crossing the street has become automatic,

And I make sure to always keep to the left side of the path.

My vocal intonation changes from time to time depending on how often I’ve been around Brits.  My work colleagues get excited and praise me when this happens. My husband calls me bluff. 

Thanks to autocorrect (and fear of being pointed out from work associates), I now type with ‘ou’ instead of ‘o’ and ‘s’ instead of ‘z’. 

Although I’ve certainly picked up some British habits, if I had to leave tomorrow, I would feel like I haven’t had enough time. It’s feels like I’ve just barely scratched the surface and am only now beginning to understand the English way of life. 

For now…..here are some of my favorite bits :)

  • Favorite part of living in London...The neighborhoods.  Not only are there endless pockets of the city to explore, but they’re so charming, so green, so pretty!

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  • Least favorite part of living in London…grey skies. I had a physical reaction to lack of Vitamin D and dance with joy whenever the city is blessed with a sunny day.
  • Favorite neighborhoods…Marylebone, Hampstead, Notting Hill.

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  • Favorite drink….Cider. I know this exists Stateside, but I didn’t get into it until the move, so now I associate it with life here.
  • Favorite place to take a visitor.….Borough Market.

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  • Favorite Afternoon TeaSketch.

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  • Favorite Tube line…Jubilee (so fast, so clean)
  • Favorite country jaunt….Cotswolds.

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  • Favorite airport….City. It’s mostly business travellers, so everyone knows what they’re doing, which makes the whole experience a breeze.
  • Favorite market….Borough Market, again.
  • Favorite train station….King’s Cross. It’s the Grand Central of London. Beautiful. 
  • Favorite high street….Marylebone High Street. Perfect mix of mainstream and niche shops and restaurants.

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  • Favorite traditional British food…Welsh rarebit. Bread, good. Mustard, good. Cheese, goooooood. 

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  • I’m most grateful for…Facetime.  There’s no replacement for a hug from a loved one, but with Facetime, I don’t miss a beat with my favorite people. In fact, I “see them” more than I used to in the States.  
  • Things I miss most about New York (besides family and friends)…Sushi (it exists, but either Nobu level or fast-food level), affordable manicures, 
  • Things I no longer have, but don’t miss….Air conditioner at home. It never gets hot enough to really miss it.
  • What’s on the horizon for year two? More travel and adventure. So far we’re planning the following: Indian, China, Burgundy, Portugal, Austria, Scotland, Barcelona, Monaco. 
Tags: London
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Britishisms - Part 3
In honor of my “One Year in London” anniversary, here’s the latest additions to my list of British English vs. American English…. 
Learnt = learned
Whilst = while
Alight = get off
Off you trot = off you go
Have a go = give it a try
Precious = sensitive 
Cracking = great
Maths = math
Shattered = exhausted
Tarte up = jazz up
Ball ache = pain in the butt
Bellend = jerk
<Part 1>
<Part 2>

Britishisms - Part 3

In honor of my “One Year in London” anniversary, here’s the latest additions to my list of British English vs. American English…. 

Learnt = learned

Whilst = while

Alight = get off

Off you trot = off you go

Have a go = give it a try

Precious = sensitive 

Cracking = great

Maths = math

Shattered = exhausted

Tarte up = jazz up

Ball ache = pain in the butt

Bellend = jerk

<Part 1>

<Part 2>

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72 Hours in Cinque Terre (and the Italian Riviera)

Photos are the only way,

To hold on to what you knew,

Because the moments they show never change,

When the people in them do. - E.H.

<Note: My travel posts are a detailed account of my experiences.  I’m tremendously grateful for every opportunity I have to visit somewhere new….in fact, I cherish it, which is why I write these for my friends and family, but also for myself, as I want to have a place to record these memories.  Not in the mood for lots of photos or a play-by-play of my travels? Ciao!>

After our visit to Tuscany, I didn’t think Italy could get any better….

And then it did. 

Two hours west of Florence is a seaside strip of villages, each seemingly in competition with the other to see which can be the most colorful and charming.

Welcome to Cinque Terre. 

We arrived just in time for what would end up being one of the top three dining experiences of my life. 

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La Ruota sits on a cliff in Moneglia, a town just north of the Cinque Terre villages with panoramic views overlooking the Italian riviera.  It doesn’t feel like a restaurant….it feels like your sitting in Eduardo’s house. In fact, it is his former home and he was actually born in the same room where we dined. 

Eduardo inherited the restaurant from his father and now acts as owner, chef, waiter, bartender, driver (he picks you up and drops you off), and officially the most entertaining person I met in all of Italy.  

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There’s no menu. You simply pay a fixed price for seven courses and Eduardo works his magic, bringing out dish after dish of whatever was fresh that day from the water just a short walk down the hill. In fact, if he notices that you particularly like a certain dish, he’ll bring out a second helping just because.  

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There’s also a wine pairing, which typically means you drop a lot of money to taste a bit of wine.  This is not the case at La Ruota. For €7 each, Eduardo presented us with a different local wine per course, leaving the bottle on the table to refresh as we wished. Following the meal, he rolled out a cart overflowing with liquors and suggested we taste some. And by ‘some’, he meant pouring us six different glasses. 

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Just as Joel and I decreed this one of, if not THE most memorable dining experiences of our lives, Eduardo showed us a little article…

Turns out the New York Times food critic agreed and hailed her meal at La Ruota as one of the best of her life, too.  As she noted, “price and prestige have nothing to do with the meals I remember best.”

You can read the whole article here. 

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Four+ hours later, just after 1am, Eduardo drove us back down to our hotel and we said goodbye and until next time…

Our hotel was Abbadia San Giorgio, a former monastery inhabited by Franciscan monks in the 15th century. Today it still exudes the same historic and spiritual atmosphere. 

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We awoke at 6:30am to the sound of the first bell tower chimes. It is, after all, an abbey.  After the fourth or fifth round (it rings every half hour), we made our way through the oasis to an elaborate breakfast spread prepared by two older women who we communicated with via our hands instead of words.  I knocked out a couple hours of work and chowed down on meats, cheese and focaccia, the latter of which Eduardo had explained was the ‘local breakfast’ as it’s the perfect balance of sweet and salty.

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Following another one of Eduardo’s recommendations, we made the scary venture to isolated Guvano Beach nearby the Cinque Terre town of Corneglia. 

This blog shares the haphazard directions, but essentially, the trek to get there is just as exciting as the cove itself, including a 1/2 mile walk through a former train tunnel in pure darkness.  

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This is the entrance, but for the following 15 minute walk, a flashlight is necessary to make your way to the other end. 

If the pitch black wasn’t enough to frighten you, just think about the noises….including the train sounds on the other side of the wall that can be mistaken for coming directly at you. 

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We made our way through and were greeted with this… 

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The Guvano Beach photos stop here because it’s a nude beach, a first time experience for both Joel and I. 

You only live once and, as the saying goes, when in Rome….or anywhere in Italy, I suppose.

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Village #1 - Vernazza 

This was the busiest of the five towns, although it certainly wasn’t the biggest. I’m also inclined to say it felt the most touristy. One afternoon was plenty of time to dig into some seaside risotto, hike the narrow stairs and take in the view from the center point of the five villages.

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Village #2 - Monterosso 

Not only is this the biggest of the five villages, but it’s also the only village with a real beach vs the rocky terrain that occupies most of the coast.

We strolled along the boardwalk, another “only-in-Monterosso-ism” before settling in for dinner at Trattoria Ciak La Lampara, where they took the seaside theme very seriously.

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Village #3 - Riomaggiore

If there was one village that I’d skip, this would be it. However, it is the most southern of the group and a good starting point for the full hike, which is exactly what we had in mind.

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Village #4 - Manarola 

Absolutely my favorite of all the Cinque Terre villages. We dove off the cliffs, sprawled out and baked on the slabs of rock and tasted the daily catch with views for days at Billy’s.

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 Village #5 - Corneglia

This is the sleepiest of the Cinque Terre villages and unlike the other four, it’s located at the top of the cliff, not down by the water.  Once you reach Corneglia, it takes another 20+ minutes just to ascend to the top where you’re met with all the houses and only a handful of shops, restaurants, etc.

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Portofino

About 20 minutes north of Cinque Terre is Portofino, another colorful harbor village, but one that felt like it just had a brand new fancy coat of paint.  It was definitely the snazziest, most “jet-set” spot on the coast. 

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Moneglia

While the Cinque Terre villages were filled with visitors from all over the world, Moneglia was full of Italian vacationers.  We finally took advantage of a real sand beach and some of the best people watching of the trip, including one epic photo of beach vendors carrying their wares on their head, which has gone missing. image

With one final pasta, we said ciao, ciao to Italy…and immediately began plotting a return visit. 

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72 Hours in Tuscany

"Tuscany, land of fierce hates and wild loves and of limitless passions." - Oscar Fay Adams

This post could also be titled “48 Hours of Eating and Drinking Through Tuscany”.

Or…

"Food and Scenery Porn, Italian Style". 

Either way, sit back, put your feet up and get ready to virtually fall in love with Tuscany.

Ciao ciao!

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After 24 hours in Florence, we hopped into an itty bitty teeny weeny Fiat (Joel naturally had a complex about it) and began the two hour sunset drive to Buenconvento, a town in southern Tuscany.  

Thinking about visiting Tuscany?

Do yourself a favor and arrive during sunset.  Sure, you’ll have a delayed arrival thanks to the constant pulling over to take pictures, but I can’t imagine a more breathtaking welcome. 

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Our Tuscan home base was Villa Armena, a family run 16th century house that just opened it’s baroque doors last year. The location is excellent, right in the middle of all the key Tuscan southern towns, while the actual house sits an extra 10 minute drive from the main village through cyprus trees to the tippy top of a hill overlooking the two of the most beautiful parts of Tuscany…

  1. Val d’Orcia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site landscape often featured in Renaissance paintings. 
  2. Crete Senesi, which consists of a range of hills and woods with a distinctive grey soil color that gives the landscape a “lunar” appearance. 

Close your eyes and envision driving to heaven. I imagine this is quite similar.

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Villa Armena truly is a family affair.  Dad is chef, Mom is the designer and concierge, Grandma is the sommelier, and doggy, Franco, is the welcome wagon.  With only ten rooms, it felt more like we were staying at a family friend’s country-home, not a hotel.  

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A peak outside our window at the purple sky and a deep breath in and I finally felt yes, this is vacation. 

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We kept the first night low key, taking in the scenery with a simple dinner at the hotel restaurant, which you can watch being cooked from the dining room. This meal turned out the be the most inventive of our trip, including this passion fruit pasta.

Totally bizarre and brilliant at the same time. 

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Fast forward to the following morning…

When you start a day in Tuscany with a view like this, you know it’s going to be good. 

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We crammed back into our little baby car, made our way down Villa Armena’s long drive way and began our official Brunello wine day, considered the king of Italian wines.

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Winery #1 was Ciacci and Piccolomini.  Frankly, I was happy to sit down and call it a day in these vineyards.  Postcard anyone?

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But, of course, there was wine to taste… (so good. so very good.)

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Olive oil to sample…

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And property tours to enjoy, including meeting a pack of hungarian wolves that the owner raises on site. Almost the same as dogs, right? They didn’t really get the whole “come here, good boy” thing. 

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Brunello wine is actually called Brunello di Montalcino, named after the fortressed hilltop village called, you guessed it, Montalcino

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It has all the makings of a quintessential Italian village….

Colorful shutters…

Piazzas galore…

A bell tower…

360 views…

Small enough to explore completely in less than two hours ….  

Did your heart skip a beat? Good, you’re human.   

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We had lunch at Osteria Osticcio Enoteca, a recommendation from Villa Armena.

Joel proclaimed their cappuccino the best he’s ever had, I proclaimed their chili pasta the best I’ve ever tasted, and we both proclaimed the view the best we’ve ever seen.  

It was also our cheapest meal in Tuscany. 

That, ladies and gentlemen, is a win, win, win, win. 

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Following Montalcino, we visited winery #2, Castiglion del Bosco. Although there’s a lot of pomp and circumstance surrounding this wine label, our guide treated us more like a friend and made us feel right at home, pulling up a chair and joining us for the tasting. 

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They also have a super secret underground den where I imagine world leaders convene to discuss important secret matters and smoke cigars. 

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We returned to Villa Armena to drop off our wine goodies, take a snooze, and prepare for the night’s adventure.

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On the itinerary? Siena, the main city in Tuscany, and a 30-minute drive north from our home base. 

Siena puts on a bit of a front by making you drive through some very serious imposing stone walls…

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But once you’re inside, there’s no doubt why this is considered the most famous medieval city.  It felt just like a charming Tuscan village, just on a significantly larger scale.

Grander piazzas. Grander churches. Grander Italy.image

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Unfortunately I can’t remember the name of where we ate, but it another recommendation from Villa Armena and again, they hit a home run. Although Siena felt the most touristy of the Tuscan destinations we visited, we were definitely the only tourists in this restaurant….always a good sign.

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Truffles were shaved in abundance…

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And Pici, a thicker version of spaghetti created in Tuscany, quickly became my favourite pasta of the trip. 

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Following the daily dessert gelato (“daily’ might be an understatement), we made our way back up through the Tuscan countryside.  In case you’re curious what that looks like at night, here you go.

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Although the next day started off dreary, the grey clouds somehow reinforced the golden valleys. This sublime landscape setting was the perfect backdrop for our Tuscan village disco tour.

One day, five Tuscan villages, GO!

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First up? Pienza.  This village is famous for three things:

1) Pope Pius II built it as “the ideal Renaissance town” in the 1600’s.

2)  It’s the birthplace of Pecorino cheese. The town literally reaks of cheese…in a good way.  

3) There’s  an abundance of flowers, a beautiful contrast to the tan stone architecture. Not a “famous” note, per se, but good to know.

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As Pienza is the hometown of Pecorino cheese, we did what one does and sat down to devour a plate of cheese washed down with a glass of red wine.

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La Taverna di Re Artu hit the nail on the head and served up the perfect cheese plate in the most charming setting in memory.

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At this point, the whole town had me dancing for joy.

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Alas, there were more towns to see. 

With Pienza in our rear view mirror, we made our way to town #2…image

Just as the sun started to poke our from behind the clouds.

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Joel proclaimed the views too distracting and he was close to accidentally driving us off the road.  These photos are evidence of that.

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Town #2 was Monticchiello. 

As with all the villages, we parked our car just outside of town, but unlike the other villages, we were in and out within 20 minutes. It’s certainly worth a quick visit, but it’s isolated beauty also means that there’s not much to see outside of a quick beautiful stroll. 

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We then set our sights on town #3, Montepulciano.   

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Although it was the most bustling of all the villages, Montepulciano was also the most touristy.  I guess you could say it was somewhere between a Siena and a Pienza. As it’s also very well known for their food (are there any Tuscan villages that aren’t?), there was plenty to taste and sample, all gratis.

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Down one particular tiny alley was a small wine tasting room full of visitors.

Why?

This charismatic man.

He begged everyone to join him for a taste of his wine, which he poured with liberal abundance. 

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He was also liberal with his hands….and lips…and used “being italian” as his excuse.

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Village #4 is a mystery.

We had a time to kill before our dinner reservations, so we decided to just pull into whatever village we hit first.

Whatever village this was, it was absolutely the most authentic. There was not a tourist in sight, let alone anyone who spoke English. 

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Still, we managed to communicate in the best way we know how…through the language of dog love.

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We stumbled upon one open cafe, came inside to dry off from the drizzling rain, pointed to a bottle of red wine, made a motion toward a glass, said grazie and pulled up a chair. 

When it came time to order a second glass, the waiter asked the other guests if anyone spoke English. No one did, so between us we managed to get that he found it unusual that we were drinking just wine. 

Flashback to a couple nights earlier when an Italian man told us how funny they find it that non-Italians drink by wine itself, that is to say, without food. In Italy, this seems to be a bit of a faux pas. If you want to drink alcohol, I guess you do that with beer? Or maybe even white wine? But a glass of red wine by itself is considered a bit odd.

Therefore, this sweet man voluntarily brought over a couple slices of thick bacon topped with pepper and and reminded us of “Italian protocol”.

Crisis averted.  

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The last visit of the day, village #5, was Montefollonico for dinner at 13 Gobbi, an excellent recommendation from another Tumblr.

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We entered, saw this, and knew we were in for a treat.

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We let the owner do the ordering, lent a helping hand cooking the pasta in a bowl of cheese, and said “yes, thank you” to the grappa and limoncello. 

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The next day was by far the most beautiful in Tuscany, but also our last.

Having explored the southern region, it was time to look toward the north and see what Chianti had to offer.

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As this was Chianti, a wine tasting was naturally in order, so we coincided it with a village pit-stop to compare and contrast.

Fonterutoli Winery was located in, once again, an itty bitty village. According to our lovely wine pourer, there are ”40, maybe 50 people” living here. We barely saw another soul.  Only horses.

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When the time finally came to wrap up our Tuscan tour, we did it right with a farewell lunch at Badia a Coltibuono where the views continued to be the main attraction.

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It may comes as a bit of the shock, but we had more pasta. 

We’re nothing if not consistent. 

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I sit here now, three weeks later, still in complete awe of Tuscany. I read this quote just before arriving and I can safely say that this is 100% true. If you’re considering a trip, don’t just pull the trigger and do it…do it as soon as possible.

"Italy is a dream that keeps returning for the rest of your life." - Anna Akhmatova

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Up next in our Italian adventure….72 hours in the rainbow colored sea towns of Cinque Terre and the Italian Riviera. 

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Tour de France - Allez Allez

Did you know that Le Tour de France rides through the UK? 

I certainly didn’t. The whole “France” thing threw me for a loop.

So imagine my surprise when I learned that not only would the race come through London, but they’d actually zoom by just downstairs from my office. 

When the cyclists were 28 km away, a couple of us popped downstairs to catch a glimpse of the action. 

We passed by our office neighbor, Buckingham Palace…

And miraculously found a teeny smooshed spot somewhat near the front (i.e. three rows back). 

I noticed some parents boosted their children on their shoulders, so I made a silly effort to do the same.

More failed attempts were made to get Lady to notice the spectacle of the situation…

But finally, as the cyclists sped by at 40 mph, she took notice.

What can I say…we really made the most of our first Tour de France experience. 

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24 Hours in Florence

"In Paris, you learn wit, in London, you learn to crush your social rivals, and in Florence you learn poise." - Virgil Thompson. 

Although I visited Italy twice earlier this year, both trips were business related, lasted a matter of hours, and were mostly spent in office buildings.

As such, when I arrived in Italy earlier this month, it not only felt like the first time…..

It felt long, long overdue.

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Joel and I landed early evening in Florence and with only an hour to spare before dinner, Joel and I did what we do best….

We got lost, but fortunately stumbled upon a beautiful arcade with live music, which ended up being quite the find.

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It was quickly time for dinner at La Giostra, a restaurant that was recommended to me by five separate people for the food (their pear ravioli is infamous for a reason!), the ambience (twinkle lights EVERYWHERE), and the characters that run it. 

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We eased the wait by befriending the bartender and toasting our Italian adventure with aggressive pours of Kir Royal and prosecco (complimentary for all guests). 

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Inside we met character #1, the chef who kept a watchful eye over every detail the entire night. 

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And Character #2, the very eccentric co-owner Dimitri d’Asburgo Lorena, who just so happens to be a Habsburg prince.  

Very, very interesting…

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The complimentary items at La Giostra don’t stop with prosseco. They also serve up gratis crostini.  

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Then there was ooey gooey burrata… 

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And what became the first of 100 consecutive meals of pasta. (only half serious…)

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La Giostra ties up the meal with a bow, errr, bottle of limoncello….again, gratis. 

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Feeling perfectly limoncello-y, we wandered around Il Duomo di Firenze.  It was completely quiet, as if you could hear the drop of a pin. How strange and lucky to have this treasure all for ourselves…even if only for a couple moments.  image

Just a hop, skip, and jump away, we returned to our rented flat, where we called it a night. 

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The following morning was a wee bit rough (thank you very much, endless limoncello), especially as I had to wake up extra early to knock out a couple hours of work.

I was very grateful for our rented apartment, which not only boasted a phenomenally central location, but also was extra spacious and comfortable, particularly when working remotely. If you’re looking for a vacation apartment in Florence (sleeps up to four), I’d be happy to share the recommendation. 

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Mid-morning, we poked our head out of our apartment to be greeted by Il Duomo di Firenze, and begin our task to see as much as possible. image

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First up? The Arno River, which if you look closely across, you can see where Kim and Kanye recently got married. I’d add in Joel’s commentary here, but I like to keep this blog free from profanity :)

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And then, the Ponte Vecchio bridge, filled with jewellery and art shops, although it was butchers that originally occupied the space.

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Just north of Ponte Vecchio is ‘Ino, a teeny cheese, meat, and panini shop that several friends hailed as “the best sandwich ever”.  While, I wouldn’t agree that it was “the best”, it was definitely great, but the meat and cheese plate was better. In fact, I brought home some of their chili sauce.

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Following lunch, we wandered through piazza after piazza, just soaking in all in renaissance history.

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Like a moth to the flame, Joel somehow spotted the random Gucci gift shop (not the regular Gucci store).

If you’re ever looking for super expensive, questionable gifts, this is the spot.

Oven mitts covered in the Gucci logo? Check. 

Leather postcards  covered in the Gucci logo? Check. 

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I had a very successful stroll through the San Lorenzo leather market and managed to haggle a beautiful brown cross-body purse down from €75 to €20. 

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Followed by a wander through the original Eataly, Central Market. 

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We only looked with our eyes though, as our next stop was very important..image

Gelato at Bar Vivolvi

This was my Mom’s favourite spot on her last visit and she hit the nail on the head. Although the gelato during the rest of our Italian trip was delicious, nothing could compare to the wonder that is Bar Vivolvi gelato. 

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Refuelled, it was time to tackle the walk up Il Duomo, which was no longer our own quiet retreat. It was now flooded with visitors as a dark, ominous storm moved in.image

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However, we instead climbed the Bell Tower, which is part of the same building and a similar height to the Duomo, but this way, the beautiful Duomo was part of the view.

The storm hit just as we ascended and threw in hail, thunder, and downpour rain just for good measure. 

It made for an exhilarating climb with breathtaking views at each level.

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We got properly soaked at the top, but it was worth it. Very worth it.

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There was a much quicker, and wetter, walk down….

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Where we then walked the one block back to the apartment, grabbed our bags, hopped in our car rental, and sped off through the tiny streets and crowded piazzas, with Joel’s anxiety growing around every turn.

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Would I recommend spending only 24 hours in Florence? Probably not, but I’d say we ticked off a lot from our varied to-see list.

And most importantly, the city jaunt was the perfect kick off to our Italian country and sea adventure. 

Up next? The golden valleys, mountaintop towns, and rolling vineyards of Tuscany. 

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Postmodern JukeBox

I’ve spent the last 24 hours listening to this band on repeat. They take current pop songs and reimagine them in a vintage era.

Genius!

My favorites include…

Miley Cyrus We Cant Stop 1950’s Doo Wop

Iggy Azalea Fancy 1920’s Flapper

Pompei Mad Men Style

Ellie Goulding Burn 1960’s Girl Group

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Happy 7th Birthday Lady Dixie!
You may be middle aged in dog years, but you&#8217;re still a young sassy pup to me.

Happy 7th Birthday Lady Dixie!

You may be middle aged in dog years, but you’re still a young sassy pup to me.

Tags: Lady Dixie